Misandry and Tea

Track Title: Drunk In Love (Remix)

Artist: Beyoncé ft. Kanye West

going55ina54:

Beyoncé – Drunk In Love (Remix) (Feat. Kanye West)

image


ittygittydiddynator:

anderjak:

toastradamus:

Roger Rabbits special effects still fucking hold up by todays standards AND looks better than most films that come out NOW it was that ahead of its time

I’m still amazed that Hoskins had that little to work with. Everything about this video is awesome.

This made my day.


cavetocanvas:

Asger Jorn, Phornix Park, 1961

cavetocanvas:

Asger Jorn, Phornix Park, 1961


voxclara:

my hopes for season two of orange is the new black:

  • the word ‘bisexual’

"I want your first trip to be with me. I want to show you cities and landscapes and teach you how to look at things in new ways and how to get along in places you don’t already know inside out. I want to put some life in you…"
Tove Jansson, from her book Art in Nature. (via allthingsmoomin)

tafadhali:

female protagonists [7/9] → The 1990s

posted 1 day ago via tafadhali with 203 notes

cedrikaprovencher:

landorus:

i feel like ‘restaurant’ shouldnt be spelled like that

les anglophones volent des mots à d’autres langues puis chialent parce qu’ils ne sont pas orthographiés comme ils le voudraient



jimmynovakancy:

*me at a party* so who wants to talk about intersectionality in feminism?

posted 1 day ago via lidewij · © princusbeau with 20,491 notes

While the context and narrative itself sets up obstacles, the film often uses visuals to help express Clarice’s status in the order of things. A recurring visual motif is Clarice surrounded by taller men, dwarfed and brought down by their stature. Yes, Jodie Foster is a short woman, just a few inches over five feet, but the film often exaggerates that discrepancy to express her challenge in overcoming a patriarchal society that literally looks down on her. […]

The film camera also never objectifies Clarice. Throughout the film she is presented as an object of the male gaze by the characters in the narrative, but the camera does not assume this perspective of the male look until the end of the film. It’s at this point then that Clarice punishes and banishes the male gaze for objectifying her. [x]